Monday, 18 March 2013

Katazome Technique Number Four: Tsukibori

The knife for tsukibori is essentially the same as the knife for shimabori except it is sharpened to a more slender point and the handle is longer. The sharp side of the knife is pointed away from the cutter thus the name 'push cutting' as opposed to 'pull cutting'. The blade is pushed through the several layers of paper with a sawing motion over a hole in a wood cutting board beneath. This technique is used to cut delicate patterns. (I have been using the pull technique for the past 15 years and now have to change my wicked ways.) Just look at what he is carving. He said it will take him a week to finish this particular stencil.




Hiro won't let me sleep until I post this on the blog. I was grumpy as a wrinkled mandarin orange because I had repeatedly refused this director. He was a nice guy, but showing up at the door without an appointment and a camera crew.... I hate speaking Japanese on camera. Who translated this? The subtitles are way off. Or is my Japanese that bad?

17 comments:

  1. Absolutely wonderful video! Thank you for posting.... your Japanese sounded just fine to me! (the subtitles were great too..)

    From another Canadian weaver...

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    1. Thanks Susan. I'll be in your neck of the woods in October. Hoping for a coffee!

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  2. made for Japanese T.V.!! no doubt they had little understanding of the techniques or the philosophy, hence the translation.--it impressed me. You have years to go yet and have a greater knowledge than most mere mortals.

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    1. That program series is a Japan lite for gaijin. Bathhouses and shopping streets, the occasional geisha kind of thing.

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  3. It's awesome! It was wonderful to see you at work since I will never get the chance to come to Japan unless I win the lottery. :) You are doing great work.

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    1. The yen is very very low. Now might be good timing.

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  4. I really enjoyed the video. (And not just because it answered a long-standing question of mine: Who IS the modern Lafcadio?) You're an inspiration.

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    1. jeeeesh. I have a love/hate relationship with this country. Lafcadio just loved it.

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  5. Thank Hiro for making you post the video - it was really great and no sign of grumpiness!

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    1. No sign??? Didn't you see me kick that speaker out of the way?

      I'll have to try harder to be a grump next time.

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  6. Bryan san, this is Ted. My wife (yoyo) and I visited your home in late Nov. The video was great and exciting to see. Watching it was like a flash back of my experience during my visit there. I was all excited hoping to learn more through the video as if I was there. I guess I'll have to wait till the next time I'm in Japan. Your blog is a wealth information keep up the great work, cant wait to see more!

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    1. Hi Ted,
      Ogata san finished the copy of your antique furoshiki today and we were talking about you. "IIotoko date!)

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    2. furshiki? Wasnt it the big wave stencil that you were planning on doing? Anyways, I would love to see it. Please tell Ogata san thank you. haha..

      Maybe I can see her and you all in June, still working on the plans.

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  7. omg! i watch cool japan every sunday,on nhk international. how did i miss this one?
    your japanese is flawless,even the pauses and rising intonation.
    and the farmhouse came out like a beauty spot.
    now back to stencil cutting ;)

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    1. I mussed up a past tense in there somewhere. Oh well.

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  8. Dear Bryan, it was like coming back. I loved the video and seeing you talking. Last year I was about to leave for Japan...very homesick indeed.

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